Guess How Much I Love You in the Spring by Sam McBratney

‘Guess How Much I Love You’ has to be one of the sweetest books you’ll ever read to your child. I’d decided long before the girls arrived that it would be a favourite bedtime story and I wasn’t wrong. Along with the classic original, Sam McBratney has written this seasonal series which continues the tales of Big Nutbrown Hare and Little Nutbrown Hare.

The ‘In the Spring’ book is a perfect introduction into this wonderful season as Big Nutbrown and Little Nutbrown spot plants, caterpillars, tadpoles and birds eggs. Big Nutbrown gently intiates conversation about each living thing they come across. Little Nutbrown, as inquisitive as ever, wants to know more.

Guess How Much I Love You in the Spring Inside Pages. Book review and Spring Activity.

Squidge says: “It’s about bunnies and tadpoles that turn into frogs!”

Suitability: Ages 2 – 5 years

Length:  5 minutes

Related topics: Seasons, changes, growing, love and relationships

Published by Walker Books

ISBN 978 1 4063 0452 7

Spring Activity

There are so many activities that could be inspired by this book and the season of Spring. Squidge, Boo and I have already been out in the garden planting our Spring bulbs after they’d sprouted in the shed! Today we went on a walk to spot some of the flowers already growing. Squidge spotted Snowdrops and Crocuses, but we couldn’t see any Daffodils blooming yet.

For our follow up activity, we dug out our transient art tree. If you’re an avid reader you’ll remember the tree from our Noticing the changes in Autumn post. It’s been safely stashed away ready to be used in each new season. We used pink and pale green buttons to symbolise the new leaves and blossom. The tree itself is drawn with felt tip onto the back of a place mat, a paper version would work just as well though. Both girls enjoyed this activity, Boo enjoyed it so much I couldn’t get a picture without her little hands coming back into the frame!

I suggested in the Autumn that you could try using different media to complete your tree if you were worried about buttons going into mouths. This time round we also tried ribbon, knotted for a better effect, and felt leaves. I think it looks just as pretty!

 

This activity is great for working that pincer grip, perfect when working towards writing with a good pencil hold.

What activities have you got planned this Spring? and which are your favourite Spring themed books?

Happy reading!

Love Cat, Squidge and Boo xxx

(This is not a sponsored post)

If you enjoyed this review and activity you might like My First Book of Dinosaurs 

Noticing the changes that Autumn brings

I love the summer, but Autumn is such a beautiful follow up. We decided to head out on an Autumn walk and see what we could notice. It took Squidge a short while to warm up to noticing what was around her on our walk. I may be to blame for this as many times when we are out walking we’re on our way somewhere, so we whizz past all the wonders that nature has offered us. However, with a few yells of “Wow what’s this?” and “Ou what can you see over there?”, she soon got into the swing.

After we’d found a few acorns and added them to our collection bag, Squidge spotted some orange berries. We had a talk about their colour and what/who might eat them. Next she had a go at one of my favourite Autumn activities, crunching through the leaves. The top layer made a lovely crunching sound, but Squidge noticed that the layer underneath was all ‘Soggy and squelchy’. Good job she’d worn her wellies!

Just around the corner from where we live we found a single, magnificent conker tree. The delight of finding those little spiky balls could be seen on Squidge’s face, and I won’t lie even I still find myself getting excited. Possibly the teacher in me, or maybe I’m still just a big kid. We found a few and added them to our collection, along with a variety of different leaves.

img_6634

Once home we tipped out our wares and put the best of it together with some of our logs. I decided to leave the berries out of the display, just incase Boo found them too tempting whilst unattended.

Squidge recalled where we’d found most of the objects and began to compare what we had, “Look at this leaf Mummy, it’s longer and it’s yellow”, “This conker is the biggest”, “We have lots of leaves but we didn’t find a lot of sticks did we?”

Simply noticing things on a short walk had sparked so much talk already.

 

Later I added some magnifying lenses, a mini telescope and a prism viewer. This gave Squidge an opportunity to take a closer look and notice things from a different perspective. The lenses we got from the local scrap store, which I’ve raved about to you before. Seriously, have you been yet?

 

img_6671I had a few ideas in mind to follow up our Autumn walk. After talking to Squidge about the different colours we’d noticed on our walk, I added crayons to the leaves we’d collected with some paper so the girls could have a go at leaf rubbing. This unfortunately wasn’t their idea of fun, I was left colouring all on my own! Oh well, this happens. I didn’t push it and decided to leave the colours and paper out incase they changed their minds or wanted to explore in their own way. Boo was the most eager to do this and revisited the Autumn collection and drew often.

Another activity which I’ve seen on Pinterest in various forms, also linked well to the colours we had noticed. I knew as it was messy they’d both love it and it would make a lovely piece to add to our display. We made an Autumn tree. All you need for this is large paper, paint in various colours and something to stamp with, we used corks (another scrap store find).

Both girls really enjoyed this activity and it is one we’ll definitely do again. I’ve seen a mini version using cotton buds which looks like it’d be great fun to try, a test of perseverance and good fine motor practice. It also inspired the next actovity.

img_6633Our button tree. Now I know not everyone has a huge collection of buttons in their cupboards, but I do, I love buttons. There are other ways you could make this activity yourselves at home, you could try using pom poms, felt or foam shapes, or paper leaves would work as I suggested over on my Instagram. You’ll have to be sensible in your choices if you have a little one who’s still mouthing things.

For the tree itself I drew on the back of a place mat with a felt tip. I love the different texture it offers and it’s a bit more sturdy than paper. I’m planning to reuse the tree with different colours come Springtime. I may also try some of the ideas I suggested above.

Both Squidge and Boo had a go at this one. I wasn’t sure how long they’d persevere with it, but they both spent a good length of time adding buttons. I supervised closely to begin with, but felt it could be left out for them to play with and revisit. The magic moment that came from this activity was when Squidge dragged all the buttons to the bottom and exclaimed “Look all the leaves are falling down off the tree!”. If this had been a glue and stick it activity she may not have had the same chance to explore and play. All our talk about Autumn must be sinking in!

Have you been on a noticing walk? What did you find? What activities did in inspire?

You may have noticed I have mentioned noticing a lot in this post ;). This is one of the learning behaviours of Building Learning Power (BLP). This philosophy is something I worked on with students whilst working in my last school and I believe it to be a very powerful way of helping children to become successful learners. It’s all about how we learn. It’s something I have adopted at home to help my own children engage in learning. I’m hoping to link a few of my posts to BLP, exploring the different behaviours and how these can be developed from an early age.