Squidge flipping her pancake in the Pancake Cafe Role Play

Pancake Cafe Role Play

With Pancake Day just around the corner and Pancakes being one of our favourite treats at any time of year, a Pancake Cafe was an easy option to introduce some role play into Squidge & Boo’s kitchen. Role play is something children develop quite naturally in their play. During pretend play you’ll hear them imitate what they see around them at home or on television. They can mimic actions, mannerisms, voices with intonation and phrases with near perfect accuracy. Sometimes with hilarious results!

There are a couple of key ways you can help your child to develop language through role play at home. The first is to play with them. Involving your child in a two-way conversation where you are both in role is very powerful. By being in role they have the freedom to try words and phrases they wouldn’t usually use. They can be whoever they want to be and often show more confidence than they would in real life situations. Involving yourself in their play, giving them responses, developing scenarios through interaction, encourages their thinking. They also have opportunities to empathise with different characters.  Another way to enhance role play and the language opportunities they create is to add props to create specific scenes and settings.

We have had a play kitchen since Squidge’s first birthday, Knowing the value in imitation play for a long time it was on my must-have toys list early on. Our original little kitchen was moved out to the Wendy House during it’s summer makeover. Luckily, Santa brought us our new kitchen and lots of wooden accessories this Christmas. Our play kitchen seems to get played with in bursts, it’s either in constant use or gathering dust. As it’s lustre seemed to have lulled a little now it’s no longer new, I decided that adding some extra bits was a good way to entice the girls back to it.

Pancake Cafe Role Play set up and ready to play.For our Pancake Cafe I added:

  • Empty kinder eggs – they are fantastic when pretending to crack them open.
  • Milk – Water and white paint mix in an old vanilla essence bottle (glued shut!)
  • Bluberries and Strawberries – simple shapes cut from felt
  • Sprinkles – fancy paper straws, cut into small pieces all in an empty oil bottle
  • Pancakes and syrup – also cut from felt, inside an empty tea bag box
  • Squidge’s apron & hat
  • A sign ‘Squidge & Boo’s Pancake Cafe’
  • A menu – one on the window and a paper one on the table. The menu included really simple prices so Squidge could ask for the right amount.

 

As soon as I started putting together the bits and pieces Squidge was excited and wanted to play. I like to make the bits while she’s there to see, as that way she can see the effort that’s been put in so she’s more likely to look after it. She also gets to see how simple it can be to make your own things to pretend with.

Once everything was in place, Squidge decided she would be a customer first and I could be the chef. I donned the hat (as best as I could, it isn’t very big!), took her order and like any good waitress, I up sold the drinks. I modelled how to use all the things I’d added to her kitchen, cracking the kinder eggs, pouring in milk and flour before twirling the whisk. I fried the felt pancakes and topped them with her choices. I brought her and Boo fresh tea and then served their delicious fake pancakes.

Squidge and Boo enjoying their pancakes in the Pancake Cafe Role Play

Squidge was certainly on board with the whole charade and tipped the contents of her plate down her jumper – into her tummy of course! I had already totted up her bill and charged her appropriately, or not, as the prices are a little extortionate with everything increasing by £1 for simplicity!

Once the plates were cleared Squidge couldn’t wait to get started as the chef. She took mine and Boo’s orders and set to work in the kitchen. She cooked up a storm and narrated her actions as she did so. I love watching this type of play unfold. I caught a few bits on film and put them on my Insta stories. She really was entertaining. ‘Oh no, why won’t my eggs crack?!’, ‘Do you want strawberries and blueberries too, it’ll be super yummy’.

Squidge showing off her pancake and toppings in the Pancake Cafe Role Play
Showing off her ‘Super yummy’ creation!

When asking how much things were from the menu, Squidge was carefully looking down the list to try give me the right price. We added simple pictures so she could find the right items herself.

Having words on objects wherever possible is a great way to introduce and encourage early ‘reading’. By that I mean, Squidge can see that the object is milk, therefore she knows the word on the side says ‘Milk’. She can play at reading this word, but it’s also going to become more recognisable as she sees it more often. Soon she’ll spot the same word on an actual milk bottle, then in the supermarket. She may also pick out the initial letter and sound and transfer this to other things. We’ve been playing with initial sounds a lot lately – but that could be a whole post in itself.

Squidge loved this game and insisted Daddy play with her when he got home from work. He happily obliged, parking himself on the tiny chair and pouring himself a pretend tea while she put sprinkles on his pancake. A memory I’ll certainly treasure. We’ve played again today after having real pancakes for breakfast. I’m certain we’ll keep up the momentum for a few more days. I may add a notepad next so Squidge can write down her orders.

We did do a little bit of addition together to add up prices. This and the writing are certainly ways you can develop this play for slightly older children. Another idea you could try would be to write recipes for the chef to follow, including the steps to make the pancakes and specific numbers for the toppings. This would lead nicely into following real recipes and creating their own versions.

What types of role play do your children enjoy? Have you got into character with them? How did it go, I’d love to hear about it!

Thanks for reading, love Cat, Squidge and Boo xxx

If you liked this post you might also enjoy Squidge and Boo’s self-chosen investigation ‘You gotta roll with it’

 

Squidge making her second playdough love bug

Love Bugs – A playdough invitation to play

As it’s the last post in our Valentine’s series this year, I thought we’d go for a playdough activity. Playdough is always a favourite in our house. Though we occasionally have the official stuff, I usually make our own playdough as its really simple and cheap to do so. You can make a large batch and add any colours/smells/sensory bits that suit your planned activity. I’ve added a simple no bake playdough recipe to the bottom of this post.

As it’s approaching Valentine’s I decided we’d go for some pink and purple playdough to make our Love Bugs. We usually use Morrison’s liquid food colours to colour our playdough. They are only £1 each andMorrisons gel food colours in pink and purple a bottle will usually last us 2/3 lots of playdough. (I also like to throw it in the bath occasionally for a bit of extra fun! Except the red one, that turns the water a murky brown – ick). The liquid colouring seems to have had an upgrade lately and I’ve been really impressed, it certainly goes further. However, they don’t tend to have a large range of colours available, so this time I decided to give their gel colours a go instead. They are also only £1 and they had more exciting colours on offer. For each batch of playdough we squirted in an entire tube of colour. I was really impressed with the pink, but the purple is a little bland. So I think I’ll stick to the liquid in future.

With our two colours of playdough ready to roll I put Pink and purple balls of playdough and craft pieces to make love bugstogether a tray of bits and pieces to help create some exciting little Love Bugs. I included buttons which Squidge helped me sort into red, pink and purple. We had foam wing shapes, two kinds of straws and some of the pieces from Mr & Mrs Potato Head. We’re fresh out of googly eyes or they’d have featured!

Squidge got stuck straight into the playdough, squeezing and rolling it, but watched carefully as I made my first Love Bug. Once she’d seen me make one she decided she was going to make herself a spider.

Squidge was really good at counting out how many legs she needed for her spider. We talked about how many would need to go on each side and she shared them out carefully on the table before pushing them into her ball of playdough. She initially chose some red button eyes, but then asked if she could swap for the Mrs Potato eyes that I’d used. She was very proud of her girl spider and decided to make a boy one to match!

In the meantime, Boo was happy exploring by twisting off chucks of her playdough until she had a large pile on the table. She kept leaving to play with other toys, but would return intermittently to explore something else. Her next mission was to empty all the buttons out of the tray, she enjoyed the noise they made as they bounced onto the table. Later she came back and took her time carefully putting straws into the top of her playdough, like birthday candles. All these activities worked her little fingers, so though it wasn’t planned, it was still very valuable fine motor work and exploratory play.

Squidge made her second spider much like her first, adding Mr Potato features, pulling them out to readjust them to the right position. She added eight legs, four to each side like before. Once she’d finished she made them talk to one another, the conversation was highly entertaining and resulted in both spiders being squished. Ouch!

I’d been busy making a playdough caterpillar, attempting to show Squidge how to use antenna, before Boo came and de-legged my poor creature. She did give him a new smile though so it wasn’t all bad.

Boo giving the playdough caterpillar a new button smileThis activity kept the girls busy for around 30 minutes and has been brought back out this morning to keep them entertained as I write this… Boo has tipped the entire contents of the tray on the floor though, so closer supervision needed if you’d like it to be a tidy activity! 😉 I can always turn it into a sorting activity.

Playdough Recipe

  • 2 cups of plain flour
  • 1/2 cup of salt
  • 1 cup of warm water
  • 2 tablespoons of oil
  • 1 tablespoon of cream of tartar (we don’t always have this in, you can use vinegar as alternative, but I prefer to just leave it out. It just means your playdough won’t last as long).
  • Food colour – optional
  • Glitter – optional

(Cup here = 1 child sized mug almost full!)

  1. Add the flour, salt & cream of tartar to a bowl & mix.
  2. Add the oil, mix.
  3. Add your colouring to the cup of warm water.
  4. Add the coloured water to your bowl gradually, you don’t always need the full cup.
  5. Once it’s formed a dough, take it out of the bowl and knead it well.
  6. If your dough is sticky add more flour/salt – I go for 1 spoon of salt to 3 spoons of flour.

If you keep your playdough in an airtight container it will last a couple of weeks. For the activity above I made two full batches.

Lots of Valentine’s love,

Cat, Squidge and Boo xxx

We hope you’ve enjoyed our Valentine’s activities. If you’ve missed any the links are just here…

Valentine’s water resist painting

Valentine’s Sensory Tub

Valentine’s Biscuits 

*This is not a sponsored post* 

 

Water beads

If you are yet to discover these little balls you are in for a treat! I first discovered them on Pinterest (where else?!). Their intended purpose is to keep flowers hydrated I believe, but they can be put to much better use in play. I purchased mine from a famous shopping site on the internet. You can get a small bag for just short of a pound, but it’s definitely worth purchasing a few at once. They are available to buy in multi colour packs, single colours and clear.

To begin with the water beads are tiny and look a little like cake sprinkles. You immerse them in water and they expand over a few hours as they absorb it. If you have patient children – or plan on having a ‘Here’s one I made earlier’ it would be worth letting children see this process. It may also be worth letting them see them dry out again. Questions will naturally occur that promote the science behind these awesome little things.

After a good couple of goes in our ‘on loan’ paddling pool (Thanks Uncle M, love S & B), I decided this would be an ideal place to play with our water beads outside. They are incredibly bouncy and I wanted the girls to be able to play without having to chase them every two minutes. They are also likely to collect dirt from the ground as they are wet to the touch – though I have nothing against a little dirt during outdoor play, I didn’t particularly want in mixed in during this activity.

Encouraging Boo’s love of pouring and scooping I added spoons, scoops and various containers. To develop Squidge’s fine motor skills I included a couple of pairs of tongs.

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Squidge was first to dive into this activity. She and I have played with water beads on several occasions before, so she knew what was in store. Boo observed from the sidelines for a little while before getting in. I’d been reluctant to let her have a go with these up until now, as she still has a tendency to mouth things and water beads are not safe to eat. Both girls spent a good length of time just feeling the water beads, holding a few in their hands, letting them fall, picking them up individually and squeezing them gently.

Both Squidge and Boo were completely immersed in their play from the minute they started. It was hard to capture the delight on Boo’s face as she barely lifted her head. The girls were both playing, but were doing so independent of one another for the majority.

Squidge tested out the scoops and spoons first, scooping and pouring from each item a couple of times before moving on to the next.

She went on to try out the first set of tongs and was so proud of herself when she managed to grip one of the beads. She did return to the tongs later on during her play and used them to transfer a few of the beads. It was time consuming, so I was quite impressed she persevered for so long!

Boo made use of one the scoops in a different way to her sister, she filled it  with the little beads, one by one. Her pincer grip is brilliant (you should see her eat peas – a definite nod to baby led weaning). She then transferred the beads by pouring them from the scoop to a larger pot. This theme continued throughout the rest of her play.

Both Squidge and Boo kept switching utensils to move the beads. The blue scoops (one from a protein shake bag, the other a baby milk scoop) and the silver bowl type scoop (from the children’s utensil set sold at my favourite Scandinavian store) were definite favourites for them both. They happily swapped between themselves, still independent in their play, unconsciously mirroring one another.

Boo then began pouring from one container to another, over and over, losing a couple of beads here and there. She would watch them bounce away, collect them and add them back to her haul. Her concentration level still remaining high.

She stirred her pots a few times, though not always with an appropriately sized spoon. Notice how she uses different hands, and both at one point to gain more control when things didn’t work as expected.

The highlight of Boo’s play for me was when she attempted to fill the smallest blue scoop with an extra water bead than I’d have expected it to hold. I’d have been happy to carry just one bead in such a small scoop, but Boo wasn’t going to be satisfied until she had three in there. In the series of pictures, it looks like quite a straightforward task, but it took Boo at least 5 minutes to get them to balance. They are quite slippery to handle and pop out of little fingers and scoops when squeezed too hard. Several times the top bead fell out, with the second one being dropped a few times whilst trying to retrieve the top one! This didn’t phase Boo. She was determined and patient – traits that I feel are part of her character.

Meanwhile Squidge happily filled and emptied the various containers. She loved shaking the clear egg box and watching the beads bounce around in the tub.

It wasn’t until the very end of this session of play that Squidge and Boo played together. Squidge pouring the beads, making funny noises as they tumbled, Boo trying to catch them as they went.

This play lasted us a good 45 minutes outside. Both girls developed their fine motor skills in various ways. They both persevered with a difficult, self chosen task until it was complete. They were both deeply immersed in their play. Not bad for £2 and a bunch of tubs and utensils.

We’ll be playing with water beads again very soon, there are so many different ways to use them. Have you used them before? Have I tempted you to give them a try? Let me know!

Thanks for reading,

Much love, Cat, Squidge and Boo Xxx

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Hot Pink Wellingtons

Something fishy…

We purchased some ‘Twirl Tubes’ for our new water wall the other day. If you’ve never seen them, they are  long, fluorescent bendy pipes – like a giant version of the bendy bit in a straw. Squidge decided that they were fishing rods (besides them being long, I have no idea why) and off she went about the house ‘fishing’.

Being a teacher (aka hoarder of all things crafty and/or reusable) and quite creative I decided I’d make her an actual fishing rod with fish to catch. I had in mind a plastic, wind up version from when I was little. The fish would bob up and down, opening and closing their mouths and you’d have to catch them with your magnetic rod. Obviously I couldn’t quite go that far, but the magnets and rods could be done.

For this activity you will need:

  • Drumsticks (or lengths of dowel)
  • Coloured foam and felt (coloured card would also work)
  • Paperclips
  • Magnets
  • Permanent marker
  • Fishing wire (or string)
  • Glue gun
  • Tray
  • Material for decorating/background

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Squidge watched me prepare this activity and was excited the minute she saw that I was cutting out fish. She helped me put the paperclips on each one. She is clearly getting used to me blogging our activities as before she dived in she asked me if I wanted to take a photo!

Once the photo was done, she went straight for the biggest fish in the ‘tank’. She had reasonable control over the rod and line but after about a minute, maybe two, she got annoyed and tossed the rod to one side. This is a fairly regular occurrence at the minute, she gives up really quickly and decides she can’t do it – when we both know full well with a bit of effort she could. Putting on her socks is the one that springs to mind.

At this point I calmly told her it was a difficult game and she had two choices, she could cry or she could try. If she cried, she definitely wouldn’t be able to do it. If she tried, she’d at least have a chance. I then left her to think about it – removing my attention from her paddy. I’d given her clear choices, the rest was up to her. I use this tactic a lot to manage behaviour and the majority of times it works a treat. Two options, the two consequences, leave to simmer and nine times out of ten they come to you with the right choice.

Squidge soon picked up her rod and decided to give it another go. Within a minute she’d caught the elusive fish, her satisfaction ever greater after the initial struggle. Fish after fish was caught, delight on her face every single time. Her level of concentration was so high. There was a little bit of cheating here and there, but I let it go, she was going to need some practice before playing against an all time magnetic fishing champion – Me of course.

With our game faces on, we were off! In this family (my husband’s side in particular – all of them!!) you play to win. This is a good thing to learn early. Hubby took me out of the legendary ‘Hat Game’ at my first major family Christmas Party, being new to it I was an easy target. I’ve never forgiven him. With this competitive spirit in mind I let Squidge believe that I was trying my best. Even if it wasn’t strictly true, she is only 3 and I do have a heart.

She was so excited, you can see it in her face. Every time she caught a fish she was counting up how many she had. Needless to say she beat me several times. I made sure I won a couple – winning every time is no fun either, and learning to be a gracious loser is also an important skill. This particular session lasted a good 40 minutes if not longer. We played again in the afternoon and as soon as Daddy got home she challenged him to a game. She set it all out her self and told him what he had to do. It was lovely to watch.

 

This simple game created plenty of opportunities to practice early maths skills. Counting up how many each person had and comparing more than and less than. When Squidge wasn’t sure who had more (usually 4 / 3) we laid out the fish in two columns side by side so she could see, visually which column had more in.

Since that initial game the other day we have played several times at Squidge’s request. You may have noticed I have drawn different shapes and patterns on the fish. I’ve casually dropped in hints at this so far ‘Oh look that one has stars on it’, ‘I think I might catch the one with zig zags next’. The idea being that at some stage I could ask her to catch a particular fish. Eventually we could add some kind of points system – double points for the fish with stars – whatever we fancy!

An idea when using this with slightly older children would be to have 10 fish. This way you could work on number bonds to 10. You have 4 fish, so how many are left in the tank? We’ve caught all the fish, you have 7 so how many do you think are on my plate? You could also number the fish and use this in different ways. Catch them in order (forwards or backwards), catch all the even ones, give them a calculation and they have to catch the fish with the answer. Anything goes, so long as it’s fun!

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If you have any other suggestions for ways to build on this game feel free to share in the comments.

Lots of love, Cat and Squidge Xx

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Mudpie Fridays
Dear Bear and Beany

‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ inspired Fruit Printing

After finding caterpillars in the garden last week followed by reading ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ by Eric Carle several times, I decided we’d do some fruit printing this morning. I hedged my bets with the weather and set it up outside. Any excuse to get out in the new garden!

For this activity you will need:

  • Paper – we used a large roll
  • Paints – we used poster paints and mixed a couple of our own colours
  • Fruits – To follow TVHC – Apple, pear, plum (I didn’t have a plum so cheated and used a new potato :)), strawberry and an orange
  • Plates for the paints
  • A bucket of soapy warm water at the ready
  • A fluffy towel

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Before we got started, we re-read the book. We have two different copies, the original board book and a finger puppet version. The finger puppet one is simplified and just gives the number, an adjective and the fruit. When Squidge retells the story herself, she merges the two together. Reading is a great way of building vocabulary.

I half expected Squidge to just dive in and go crazy, but she was keen to count how many of each fruit she needed. I didn’t ask her to put them in a row, she just did. Reading the story before we started certainly influenced both of these. I used the finger puppet book to support her throughout as the pictures are much larger and were easier for her to count as she was printing. You can see her double checking how many she needed in one of the photos.

For each fruit she counted aloud – an early years practitioners dream observation! Luckily as her Mummy I don’t have to fill in any paperwork, I can just enjoy the fun. Squidge printed all of the fruits in turn. Besides the counting, she was very quiet and focussed on the task.

After Squidge had finished counting all the fruits, I said she could print as many as she wanted. She continued with a few more oranges and then, as with any good painting activity if you ask me, she decided to really dive in…

I love her face in this series of pictures – you’d think she’d never printed with her hands before! We’re slowly building a hand and footprint alphabet so we have done it a lot. Clearly it still fascinates her every time though.

She then got her feet in the paints. One foot first, then both. She worked her way along the paper carefully, making sure she pressed her foot all the way from back to front, ensuring a clear print. Squidge was eager to wash her hands and feet between each set of prints, so having the warm soapy water and towel to hand was great. I’d definitely recommend this if you decide to get a messy activity out. You don’t want to have to leave it unattended, especially with a smaller sibling in tow!

I always encourage both girls to get involved in the clean up – they had all the fun making the mess after all. They are usually happy to do so, especially if it’s washing up. They don’t always get the clean up finished, but I’m happy that they show willing and want to help.

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Here’s our finished Hungry Caterpillar inspired print plus hands and feet. We hope you like it! 🙂

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If you enjoyed this post you’ll love our Marble Painting activity!

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